qisasukhra

مصائب قوم عند قوم فوائد

Category: Uncategorized

The Translator’s Soliloquy

A translation of a poem by Ahmed Shafie, حديث المترجم لنفسه

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I wish I knew

The first poem, ليت شعري هل دروا, from Ibn Arabi’s ترجمان الأشواق

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A short poem

A short poem by Youssef Rakha. The Arabic should be here.

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A poem by Yasser Abdellatif

An unpublished poem by Yasser Abdellatif entitled زيارة أخرى إلى برج السراب

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if You please

A very small extract from Nael Eltoukhy’s latest novel-in-process-of-being-published-but-not-published, الخروج من البلاعة (Out of the Gutter).

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The Brimming Sea

A translation of the opening poem of Ibn Arabi’s Diwan, which has already appeared on Youssef Rakha’s site, here, with a link there to the Arabic.

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Iman Mersal on Saniya Salih

This is a translation of Iman Mersal’s article on Saniya Salih, published by Al Akhbar in August 2015 and available here.

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In Dhu Salam

The twelfth poem, بذي سلم والدير من حاضر الحمى, from Ibn Arabi’s ترجمان الأشواق  

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Saniya Salih and Mohamed Al Maghout

One poem each by Saniya Salih and her husband Mohamed Al Maghout. These translations previously appeared more beautifully on Youssef Rakha’s site here and here, with a note in the case of Al Maghout fleshing out the historical background of this early poem.

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A small poem by Saniya Salih

A small poem from Syrian poet Saniya Salih‘s 1970 collection حبر الإعدام [Execution Ink]. Salih died in her 50s after a lifetime of illness. An extraordinary and pioneering poet in her own right, the shadow cast by her marriage to Muhammad Al Maghout has meant she is less read than she should be. Her later poems addressing her relationship with their two daughters, Sham and Sulafa, written as her health declined, are amazing. Thanks to Iman Mersal for introducing me to her work properly.

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